Bombarding people with viagra adverts increases the number of babies born, study shows 


The hard sell: Bombarding people with VIAGRA adverts on TV and radio INCREASES the number of babies born, study shows

  • A new study claims one per cent increase in ED advertising can affect birth rates
  • Co-author Dr Tongil Kim says his data suggests it isn’t only older men using pills
  • The new study was published in the Journal of Marketing Research

Bombarding people with adverts on television and radio for Viagra increases the number of babies that are born, a new study claims.

Viagra has been advertised on television in the UK since it was reclassified from prescription-only to over the counter medication a few years ago.

The new study, published in the Journal of Marketing Research, claims that a one per cent increase in advertising of erectile dysfunction caused the birth rate to increase between 0.04 and 0.08 per cent. 

Bombarding people with adverts on television and radio for Viagra increases the number of babies that are born, a new study claims (stock image)

Dr Tongil Kim is a co-author of the study and an assistant professor at the University of Texas in Dallas. 

He examined the advertising stats of Viagra (sildenafil), Levitra (vardenafil) and Cialis (tadalafil) compared to the births at a hospital in Massachusetts between 2001 and 2010 as well as 15 million US birth certificates between 2000 and 2004.

Two neighbouring postcodes were examined in the study, with one receiving more erectile dysfunction adverts than the other. 

Birth rates were found to be higher in the postcode that received more adverts. 

Dr Kim said: ‘One popular hypothesis for the increased birth rates focused on older male ad viewers taking the pill and fathering more babies.

The new study, published in the Journal of Marketing Research, claims that a one per cent increase in advertising of erectile dysfunction caused the birth rate to increase between 0.04 and 0.08 per cent (stock image)

The new study, published in the Journal of Marketing Research, claims that a one per cent increase in advertising of erectile dysfunction caused the birth rate to increase between 0.04 and 0.08 per cent (stock image)

‘The data, however, did not show an increase in the average age of the fathers.

‘It is possible this effect plays a role equally across different age groups’.

However, another explanation of the findings is that the suggestive power of the adverts had an affect on some men even if they didn’t purchase the pills.  

Dr Kim said: ‘As for the content of the ads, many of the ED drug commercials during the data period featured suggestive ad copy and content, which resulted in some people deeming ED drug ads inappropriate for family viewing, as demonstrated by a legislative bill that was introduced in 2009 calling to ban ED drug ads on TV between 6am and 10pm.’ 

Two neighbouring postcodes were examined in the study, with one receiving more erectile dysfunction adverts than the other. Birth rates were found to be higher in the postcode that received more adverts (stock image)

Two neighbouring postcodes were examined in the study, with one receiving more erectile dysfunction adverts than the other. Birth rates were found to be higher in the postcode that received more adverts (stock image)

The research also found that erectile dysfunction pills were particularly effective among families with lower incomes.

Additionally, those people who consumed greater amounts of ED adverts were more likely to search online for pregnancy related content.

The researchers hope their findings will help monitor the ‘united health consequences’ of advertising by pharmaceutical companies. 

Dr Kim said: ‘This is not only a responsible thing to do, but it can also create creative marketing opportunities.

‘For example, companies selling infant-related medicines and goods like children’s cold medicine, baby car seats or diapers might use ED drug ads as an additional market variable to better anticipate and predict local pregnancy rates 10 months later – essentially their market potential – and improve upon jointly deploying marketing and distribution resources across various regions.’ 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk