Blue-ringed octopus crawls out of shell young girl was collecting on Sydney beach


Bloody shell! Terrifying moment deadly octopus almost bites a young girl after it crawled out of an empty shell she picked up on the beach

  • A girl was collecting shells on Balmoral Beach, Sydney’s North Shore, on Friday
  • When she went to show her mother the shell the blue-ringed octopus appeared 
  • Blue-ringed octopus bites can be deadly and have the ability to kill humans 

A man has revealed a child’s terrifying encounter with a deadly blue-ringed octopus after it crawled out of a shell she was carrying.

The man shared a video of the deadly octopus in a blue bucket to social media on Friday.

The little girl had found the shell at the northern end of Balmoral Beach, on Sydney’s north shore, and put it in her bucket. 

The clip showed the octopus swimming in the bucket with sand at the bottom – with the octopus appearing to attempt to climb up the walls of the toy.

The man shared a video of the deadly sea creature swimming in a blue bucket to social media on Friday

‘A young girl was swimming and collecting shells and putting the shells in the top of her swimmers,’ the man captioned the video.  

‘When she came back to shore and took the shells out… the blue ringed octopus fell out!’

The man said the girl’s mother almost had a ‘heart attack’ after she saw the extremely close call her child had.

He said after the video had been shot he took the blue-ringed to a secluded part of the beach away from swimmers to set it free.

Social media users were shocked by the find.

‘My daughter and her friends found one the other year in the swimming area,’ one social media user said.

Another said: ‘That’s so nice of you to move the little octopus.’ 

He said it was found at the northern end of Balmoral Beach, in Sydney's North Shore, by a little girl (stock)

He said it was found at the northern end of Balmoral Beach, in Sydney’s North Shore, by a little girl (stock)

A third said: ‘They seem to be a regular in the rock pools at Balmoral. Best to leave it alone!’

The most common type of blue-ringed octopus found in Sydney is the blue-lined octopus.

It is one of six species of the octopus found in Australia.

Despite its high toxicity there have been just three recorded deaths in the last century – two in Australia and one in Singapore. 

Blue-ringed octopus bites

  • The blue-ringed octopus bite is highly venomous to humans and emergency services should be called immediately if it occurs 
  • Blue-ringed octopuses are not aggressive animals and most cases of bites are from a person picking up and handling the creature, or stepping on it
  • It injects its toxin by biting – the venom is held in salivary glands and the mouth of the octopus in on the underneath side in the middle of the body
  • Most bites cause minimal pain for the first 5-10 minutes then begin to throb and may get numb
  • The bite could cause excessive bleeding, nausea, vomiting, changes in vision and difficulty swallowing
  • After 10 minutes, the victim may have difficulty breathing, become paralysed, and require artificial ventilation until they can be transported to a hospital 
  • The duration of life-threatening symptoms is usually 4 to 10 hours – after that time, surviving patients typically show rapid signs of improvement 
  • There is no anti-venom available for blue-ringed octopus bites 
  • In extreme cases, blue-ringed octopus bites can cause death from respiratory failure or cardiac arrest 
  • Despite its high toxicity there have been just three recorded deaths in the last century – two in Australia and one in Singapore

Source: emedicinehealth

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