Apple’s car is scaled back – if it arrives it will NOT be fully self-driving but could cost $100K


Long-delayed Apple car has been scaled back: IF it arrives in 2026, over 10 years since rumors began, it will still not be fully self-driving and could cost up to $100,000

  • Apple’s car won’t arrive before 2026 and will not be fully self-driving, a new report reveals
  • Codenamed Project Titan, the vehicle will have autonomous capabilities on highways, but it will also have a steering wheel and brakes 
  • The car will be driven by a system called Denali that uses a processor that’s as powerful as ‘about four of Apple’s highest-end Mac chips combined 
  • The effort to build a car started in 2014 and has seen numerous executives come and go over the years

Apple’s long-delayed and troubled car project has been scaled back – it won’t be fully self-driving if it arrives in 2026.

Known internally as Titan, the Apple car will have a steering wheel and pedals, according to a Bloomberg report, which is a step down from the fully autonomous vehicle the company initially had planned. 

The Cupertino, California company was first rumored to be working on an electric vehicle with all the stylistic notes and software prowess of its popular smartphones and computers in 2014. 

The new version of the vehicle will have self-driving features that can be used on highways and will be driven by a system codenamed Denali that uses a processor that’s as powerful as ‘about four of Apple’s highest-end Mac chips combined,’ Bloomberg’s Mark Gorman reports. 

Apple’s long-delayed and troubled car project has been scaled back – it won’t be fully self-driving if it arrives in 2026. Above: a concept of Apple’s self-driving car

The new version of the vehicle will have self-driving features that can be used on highways and will be driven by a system codenamed Denali that uses a processor that's as powerful as 'about four of Apple's highest-end Mac chips combined,' Bloomberg's Mark Gorman reports

The new version of the vehicle will have self-driving features that can be used on highways and will be driven by a system codenamed Denali that uses a processor that’s as powerful as ‘about four of Apple’s highest-end Mac chips combined,’ Bloomberg’s Mark Gorman reports

Apple is reportedly planning to offer the car for less than $100,000, instead of a price above $125,000.

The car will allow motorists to watch movies and multitask on highways, but it will provide alerts when it’s time to switch back to manual control for city streets or in bad weather, Bloomberg reports.  

The project has experienced a number of executive shakeups over the course of the project’s life, which may have caused the delays.

Project Titan has at various times been led by Ian Goodfellow, Bob Mansfield, Doug Field and Kevin Lynch. 

At one point, it was reported that Apple CEO Tim Cook, above, was not interested in Project Titan

At one point, it was reported that Apple CEO Tim Cook, above, was not interested in Project Titan

Currently, AI and machine learning chief John Giannandrea is heading up the ‌Apple Car‌ project, and Kevin Lynch, known for his work on the Apple Watch, is also overseeing work on the car, MacRumors states.

The Apple news site also reports the firm will use the cloud for some AI processing, and may have a remote command center that could assist drivers and control cars from afar during emergencies. It might also offer its own insurance program to companies. 

CEO Tim Cook, who was reported by the Information to have ‘rarely’ visited the project’s offices in Santa Clara, California, is apparently still interested in pursuing a car. 

Apple’s former chief design officer Jony Ive, who played a vital role in designing most of the company’s most popular products, is reportedly consulting with the tech giant and has told the Apple Car team to ‘lean into the weirdness’ of its design and ‘not try to hide the sensors.’ 

The Apple Car team crafted several sleek demo videos for Cook and other high-level leaders – including a 40-mile trek through Montana filmed by drones – to demonstrate the project’s progress earlier this year. 

Despite the delays and scaling down, it’s possible that consumers will embrace the tech company’s vision for a car that’s partly powered by artificial intelligence. 

Apple’s nonexistent self-driving car is already being embraced by consumers as a new survey reveals that 26 percent of drivers would ‘definitely consider’ buying a vehicle from the iPhone maker.

Consulting firm Strategic Vision surveyed 200,000 new car owners and for the first time added Apple to the more than 45 brands that consumers could share their views on.

Only Toyota and Honda ranked higher on the brand consideration question, at 38 percent and 32 percent, with Tesla taking 20 percent. 

Apple’s nonexistent self-driving car is already being embraced by consumers as a survey reveals 26% of drivers would ‘definitely consider’ buying a vehicle from the iPhone maker.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk