Adele Roberts says she is ‘so excited’ to finish her final cycle of chemotherapy for bowel cancer 


‘My body’s feeling it now’: Adele Roberts says she is ‘so excited’ to finish her final cycle of chemotherapy for bowel cancer and her spirit is ‘feeling good’

Adele Roberts has said she is ‘so excited’ to finish her final cycle of chemotherapy for bowel cancer.

The BBC Radio 1 presenter announced her diagnosis in October and has since been sharing her journey and raising awareness of the disease.

Despite admitting that her body is ‘feeling it now,’ the brave 43-year-old said on Thursday’s Lorraine that her spirit is ‘feeling good.’ 

‘My body’s feeling it now’: Adele Roberts said she is ‘so excited’ to finish her final cycle of chemotherapy for bowel cancer as she appeared on Thursday’s Lorraine 

Adele, appearing via video link, was asked by the Scottish presenter how she is doing, to which she replied: ‘I’m great thank you Lorraine, and thank you for such a wonderful campaign. It’s been an honour to be a part of this.’ 

The ITV daytime show has been at the helm of a campaign, No Butts, which highlights the importance of getting symptoms of bowel cancer checked out as soon as possible.

The broadcaster also revealed in the interview that she is approaching the end of treatment.

Brave: The BBC Radio 1 presenter, 43, announced her diagnosis in October and has since been sharing her journey and raising awareness of the disease

Brave: The BBC Radio 1 presenter, 43, announced her diagnosis in October and has since been sharing her journey and raising awareness of the disease

”I’m so excited to finish, not long to go now. I started my final cycle on Tuesday. It is starting to stack up. 

‘My body’s feeling it now, but my spirit is still feeling really good and it’s thanks to campaigns like yours that I’m getting out of bed every day and just living my best life,’ she said. 

On the big pants advertising the No Butts campaign, Lorraine told viewers, ‘It was about trying to get peoples’ attention – trying to make people go, “Oh, what’s all this about?”‘

Optimistic: Despite admitting that her body is 'feeling it now,' the brave broadcaster said on Thursday's Lorraine that her spirit is 'feeling good'

Optimistic: Despite admitting that her body is ‘feeling it now,’ the brave broadcaster said on Thursday’s Lorraine that her spirit is ‘feeling good’

Doctor Hilary Jones added: ‘Humour with these things is good – it breaks the ice. 

‘There’s no room for embarrassment – it’s just part of the human body. People need to get over that. Grow up, talk about the symptoms in any language you want, you’re not going to embarrass a doctor, any doctor.

‘We know that people have called us and said this programme had been instrumental in getting them to the doctors, getting an early diagnosis and getting a cure. There’ll be more in the future.’

Poignant: The ITV daytime show has been at the helm of a campaign, No Butts, which highlights the importance of getting symptoms of bowel cancer checked out as soon as possible

Poignant: The ITV daytime show has been at the helm of a campaign, No Butts, which highlights the importance of getting symptoms of bowel cancer checked out as soon as possible

Brave: On Wednesday night, Adele broke down in tears as she won the Radio Times Moment of the Year gong at the Audio & Radio Industry Awards on Tuesday while receiving a standing ovation

Brave: On Wednesday night, Adele broke down in tears as she won the Radio Times Moment of the Year gong at the Audio & Radio Industry Awards on Tuesday while receiving a standing ovation

On Wednesday night, Adele broke down in tears as she won the Radio Times Moment of the Year gong at the Audio & Radio Industry Awards on Tuesday while receiving a standing ovation.

The respected radio DJ had revealed she was starting her final round of chemotherapy in an emotional Instagram video posted just hours earlier – and picked up the gong for her return to Radio 1 after treatment for her cancer.

On the red carpet before entering the Adelphi Theatre in the West End, she wore a red waistcoat and matching flares with trainers.

THE SYMPTOMS OF BOWEL CANCER, WHICH DEVELOPS FROM POLYPS IN THE COLON AND RECTUM

Bowel, or colorectal, cancer affects the large bowel, which is made up of the colon and rectum.

Such tumours usually develop from pre-cancerous growths, called polyps.

Symptoms include:

  • Bleeding from the bottom
  • Blood in stools
  • A change in bowel habits lasting at least three weeks
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Extreme, unexplained tiredness
  • Abdominal pain

Most cases have no clear cause, however, people are more at risk if they: 

  • Are over 50
  • Have a family history of the condition
  • Have a personal history of polyps in their bowel
  • Suffer from inflammatory bowel disease, such as Crohn’s disease
  • Lead an unhealthy lifestyle  

Treatment usually involves surgery, and chemo- and radiotherapy.

More than nine out of 10 people with stage one bowel cancer survive five years or more after their diagnosis.

This drops significantly if it is diagnosed in later stages. 

According to Bowel Cancer UK figures, more than 41,200 people are diagnosed with bowel cancer every year in the UK. 

It affects around 40 per 100,000 adults per year in the US, according to the National Cancer Institute.

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