Aboriginal woman slams ‘disrespectful’ American woman for playing a didgeridoo in a TikTok video


Aboriginal woman slams ‘disrespectful’ American ‘healer’ for ‘pole dancing’ with a didgeridoo in viral video

  • Belle Arvie, from Florida, pole danced and played a didgeridoo in a TikTok video
  • Marion, an indigenous Australian woman, slammed her and told her to delete it
  • US woman initially refused and issued a bizarre response defending her actions
  • Ms Arvie eventually apologised, but kept the original video in her statement


An American reiki practitioner has been slammed by an Aboriginal woman for playing and ‘sexualising’ the didgeridoo by pole dancing with it in an online video.

Belle Arvie, from Jacksonville in Florida, uploaded the now-deleted TikTok clip last week, which featured her dancing salaciously with the Australian instrument and lip syncing out of time to the techno song Do It Do It, by US-based DJ Acraze.

She then played the didgeridoo while smiling at the camera and rolling her hips.

Hours later, an indigenous Australian TikTok user named Marion tore shreds off Ms Arvie for ‘disrespecting our most sacred f***ing lores’ and urged her to take the video down.

According to Aboriginal customs, women are not allowed to touch a didgeridoo because it could lead to infertility.

Pictured: Belle Arvie playing a didgeridoo

In a TikTok video, Belle Arvie played a didgeridoo. According to Aboriginal customs, women are not allowed to touch a didgeridoo

‘Honestly, it is f***ing disgusting for women like you to disrespect our most sacred f***ing lores … but you go and sexualise one of our most sacred tools,’ Marion said in her own TikTok video.

‘I’m not labelling this as racism, I’m labelling this as complete disrespect to my culture.’ 

Ms Arvie, a self-proclaimed herbalist and sound therapist, then issued a bizarre response where she apologised for causing offence, but claimed she wasn’t sexualising the instrument.

‘If you find me sexy, that’s none of my business,’ she laughed. 

‘I just danced … I did a dance because, let me tell you where I’m coming from – I love the didgeridoo.’

‘I’ve loved it for over 20 years. I’ve been inspired by both male and female players from all around the world.’ 

Marion (pictured bottom right), an indigenous Australian woman, was horrified by Ms Arvie's clip

Marion urged Ms Arvie to take the video down

Marion (pictured bottom right), an indigenous Australian woman, was horrified by Ms Arvie’s clip and urged her to take it down

Ms Arvie (pictured) apologised for causing offence but initially refused to take the video down

Ms Arvie (pictured) apologised for causing offence but initially refused to take the video down

When another user tried to defend the American woman by claiming she didn’t know about Aboriginal traditions and didn’t mean to cause offence, Marion chimed in.

‘She did know the lores because she was told multiple times, and she even said she did her own research on our lores,’ Marion said.

She referenced the moment Ms Arvie wrongly claimed that women were allowed to play the didgeridoo in certain regions.

Marion said: ‘It was the wrong research stating that women can actually play the didgeridoo when, in actual fact, they can’t.’

‘If she didn’t intentionally cause drama, then why did she not listen? Why did she not take it down? Don’t justify her actions.’

On Monday, Ms Arvie announced she finally deleted the original clip and pledged to ‘spread awareness’ about the topic.

Ms Arvie finally issues an apology and took the initial video down, but kept the clip of her dancing with the didgeridoo in the apology (pictured)

Ms Arvie finally issues an apology and took the initial video down, but kept the clip of her dancing with the didgeridoo in the apology (pictured)

‘I’ve removed my video out of respect because I am American and unaware of the sacredness behind this instrument,’ she wrote.

‘Here’s a reminder to those like me that I had/have no idea. Lesson learned.’ 

She also reposted the clip where Marion slams her for ‘disrespecting’ Aboriginal culture – while the clip of her dancing with the didgeridoo plays in the background. 

When a social media user asked Ms Arvie why the video was in the apology, she said she didn’t want to ‘silence indigenous people’.

‘But why is the video still in the apology? How is that a proper apology if you’re still showing the video that caused offence?’ the user asked.

She responded: ‘I’m allowing her voice to be heard. I’ve been accused of trying to silence indigenous people. So this is a great way to help spread awareness.’

Daily Mail Australia has reached out to Ms Arvie for comment. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk